HISTORY

Mr. Bill, on October 15, 1888, sent identical letters to a group of Groton citizens in which he stated that he wished to found a library to honor the memory of his two sisters, Eliza and Harriet. For this purpose he had selected some 1700 books and provided cases to be installed in an upper room of the First District schoolhouse, which then stood on the site of the present Groton Heights School.

His aim in the selection of these books, according to his letter, was that "in the volumes collected there may be found that which will tend to stimulate a high ambition, strengthen good resolve, cultivate the taste an afford pleasure to all who may read them."

The library was opened for the distribution of books on November 20,1888, with 1750 volumes on hand.

During the next year, Mr. Bill had plans drawn up for a new library, choosing for it a site upon the summit of Groton Heights overlooking the Thames River. The original library building, designed by Stephen C. Earle of Worcester, Mass., was constructed of Stony Creek granite, trimmed with Maynard freestone, and finished with a red slate roof. It was dedicated on June 18, 1890.

 

In 1907, extensive additions to the building were made by Mr. Bill for the purpose of enlarging the main reading room and providing space for a natural history museum. At this time a collection of birds was added to a collection of butterflies and paintings. The butterflies and paintings can still be seen today. In 1994 a granite addition matching the existing building was completed, providing a spacious new reference room, offices, public restroom and handicapped access.

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